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All posts tagged "sandy bridge"


Monday, October 31, 2011

A Q&A With Intel Canada on Sandy Bridge's QuickSync Feature

Posted by Jason Dunn in "Digital Home Talk" @ 09:00 AM

Intel's second generation Core i-series processors, referred to by us geeks as "Sandy Bridge CPUs", brought with them a significant boost in overall processing power. What really got me curious though was Intel's QuickSync technology. Intel has a page on their Web site that talks about this technology, but I wanted to dig deeper so I reached out to Intel Canada and Joe Ellis, Market Development Manager for Intel Canada, responded.

DHT: A key feature in the second generation of Intel Core processors, known as Sandy Bridge CPUs in the tech circles, is the inclusion of an on-chip graphics processor. One of the benefits of this integration is Intel's Quick Sync video technology. Can you describe what Quick Sync technology is and how it works? Why is it better that a straight CPU-based video encode?

ELLIS: "Intel Quick Sync Video has often been described as "hardware acceleration" technology built into 2nd Gen Intel Core processors. This is partially correct. Traditional hardware acceleration has been enabled through software optimizations for general-purpose CPU resources otherwise shared with multiple PC functions. This approach was widely adopted with the first MMX instruction set in 1995, and resulted in much faster multimedia rendering and playback times - though often at the expense of other computing functions waiting for those same computing resources. Subsequent Intel CPU generations introduced ever more powerful instructions and architectural advancements to accelerate a variety of parallel tasks, but always using processor resources common to every task." Read more...


Thursday, March 17, 2011

Dell Updates Vostro 3000 Lineup With Sandy Bridge

Posted by Michael Knutson in "Dell Laptops & Netbooks" @ 09:30 PM

http://www.engadget.com/2011/03/17/...sors-affordabl/

"Not another business laptop updated with Sandy Bridge processors! We know, it's getting a bit repetitive at this point, but what if we told you this group blends together some awesome features and won't cost you more than $600?"

Dell has gotten praise for their Vostro 3000 lineup, and now, at no increase in price, the 13-inch, 14-inch, 15-inch and 17.3-inch Vostros all contain Intel Sandy Bridge processors. More power (i3,i5,i7), better battery life, and all models start at $600 or less. I really like the backlit keyboard, use of aluminum, matte screen, improved keyboard, and improved sound. If Dell can keep their quality consistent (high), they may have another winner here!


Wednesday, February 2, 2011

Intel's Sandy Bridge Architecture: Great Performance and Battery Life In Notebooks

Posted by Michael Knutson in "Laptop Thoughts News" @ 09:30 PM

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews...obile,2838.html

"Today's desktop replacements deliver a ridiculous amount of performance compared to the mobile flagships we've seen in the past. But these powerhouses come with a trade-off, other than their hefty price tags. You see, there is an unbreakable relationship between compute horsepower and power consumption."

A very detailed report on processor architecture, this story provides scads of information on Intel's latest moves to stay ahead of AMD in their never-ending competition. Some highlights: Intel's naming scheme of Core i7, Core i5 and Core i3 corresponds to good, better, and best; Mobile and Desktop processors now can be nearly equivalent in performance; Top Intel processors are expensive; In benchmarks, Sandy Bridge beats Arrandale, Clarksfield and Clarkdale across a gamut of tests; Sandy Bridge-based chips use less power than older platforms. Last but not least, tom's hardware recommends that if you're looking for a full-sized notebook, wait for one based on Sandy Bridge: you'll get better performance and a substantial increase in battery life.


Monday, January 31, 2011

Intel Identifies Serious Chipset Error on Sandy Bridge Support Chip, Halts Shipment

Posted by Jason Dunn in "Laptop Thoughts News" @ 12:00 PM

http://blog.laptopmag.com/intel-ide...ries-6-chipsets

"This morning, Intel announced it had detected a serious error in one of the support chips that ships with its 2nd Generation Core Series CPUs (aka Sandy Bridge), and has stopped shipment of the affected chipsets while it manufactures new versions of the chip for shipment to customers in late February. The company expects full volume recovery in April and, accordingly adjusted its revenue projections lower by about $300 million. Due to the delays in shipping the chipset, OEMs may also choose to delay shipping some or all of the their new Sandy Bridge notebooks, though none of the notebook vendors has commented yet."

Given the incredibly complexity of the technology we use today, it's somewhat surprising problems don't happen more often - but Intel is certainly doing the right thing in jumping on this issue before it impacts the wider public. It seems the lessons they learned from the Pentium floating point bug back in the '90s haven't been forgotten.


Friday, January 21, 2011

Sandy Bridge Laptop Tests Reveal Performance Boost

Posted by Hooch Tan in "Laptop Thoughts News" @ 12:00 PM

http://news.cnet.com/8301-17938_105...20028200-1.html

"But under the hood, much has changed. As we reported from CES, "highlights of the second-generation Core processors, built around a new 32nm microarchitecture, include more energy-efficient performance and improved 3D and graphics performance. Intel claims that with this new generation of CPUs, content creation is up to 42 percent faster and gaming up to 50 percent faster than with previous generations."

Sandy Bridge is out and everyone is chomping at the bit to see what it can really do. CNET has their hands on a laptop provided by Intel to put it through its paces and the results are quite pleasant. Almost everything, with the exception of multimedia performance, is faster, stronger, better. As for multimedia? Well, it certainly trumps a lot of existing integrated solutions but it still lags behind discrete video cards. That is hardly a surprise though and the big question is is the video performance just enough to satisfy most people? Considering that many have lived with old Intel GPUs, I would say yes. It even seems capable of some degree of low-end gaming. Of course, games are not the only benefit but the most obvious one. And check out the battery life! So while tablets may be the new hotness, it looks like laptops have their own song to sing.


Wednesday, September 1, 2010

Intel's Sandy Bridge To Somewhere

Posted by Hooch Tan in "Digital Home News" @ 12:00 PM

http://www.anandtech.com/show/3871/...wins-in-a-row/1

"That's all going to change starting next year. This time it's the masses that get the upgrade first. While Nehalem launched with expensive motherboards and expensive processors, the next tock in Intel's architecture cadence is aimed right at the middle of the market. This time, the ultra high end users will have to wait - if you want affordable quad-core, if you want the successor to Lynnfield, Sandy Bridge is it."

The huge force that is Intel continues moving along at a steady pace. While AMD is fighting back with its Bobcat and Bulldozer chips, Intel's Sandy Bridge seems to be a continuation of moves first seen with the Core i3 and i5 processors. Processing power is increasing, as expected, but the integrated graphics are what have caught my eye. While integrated graphics offered low power consumption and great 3D performance at a great price, its 3D capabilities were laughable at best. While Sandy Bridge will not be toppling the discrete GPU market, it is edging into the lower end and that means that the lowest bar for computing will offer something worthwhile. Programs like Google Earth will run even more smoothly, and 3D accelerated browsers are right around the corner. We might be watching the next push in computing fads!


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