Laptop Thoughts: News & Reviews on Laptops, Netbooks, Slates, and More.

Be sure to register in our forums and post your comments - we want to hear from you!


Android Thoughts

Loading feed...

Windows Phone Thoughts

Loading feed...

Digital Home Thoughts

Loading feed...





All posts tagged "cr-48"


Thursday, December 23, 2010

Chrome OS: From the Cloud to the Desktop

Posted by Michael Knutson in "Other Laptops & Netbooks" @ 01:00 AM

http://gdgt.com/discuss/what-does-c...tm_medium=email

"What does Chrome OS -- or any cloud OS -- need to do to go mainstream? I was a little surprised when a Cr-48 -- that new Chrome OS laptop Google has been sending people to test -- showed up on my doorstep last week. I honestly wasn't expecting to get one -- Ryan got gdgt's review unit -- I just applied for one online like everyone else and kept my fingers crossed. I've spent a decent amount of time with it over the past few days (I'm writing this newsletter on it), and so far have some things I like (how easy it is to get setup, how quickly it boots up) and few things I don't like (the horrible trackpad and how awful fonts look)."

An interesting perspective on where Google may be going with this whole Chrome OS (CR-48) thing. Is it really intended for enterprises, or are consumers the target audience? With 60,000 or more CR-48s heading to various places and people, we should soon start seeing more and more reviews. The gdgt article lists some of the things that will be needed for the platform to succeed: price (lower than a netbook); battery life (eight hours would be nice); speed (faster than a netbook); simplicity (easier); support (less hassle please!); connectivity (cheap and ubiquitous). For me personally it won't replace the 'big iron' (or rather, 'big aluminum'), but it'll be a great in-between device for light duty.  Imagine one of these in each room ... I can.


Tuesday, December 14, 2010

Chrome and Nothing but Chrome ...

Posted by Michael Knutson in "Other Laptops & Netbooks" @ 11:30 PM

http://lifehacker.com/5713348/six-d...kyline=true&s=i

"For the last six days, I've used a Chrome OS netbook as my primary computer, and it's been a blast. Using a "just enough", basically Chrome-only system provides a rare chance to reexamine what it is you really need to be productive."

Interesting review on how to potentially minimize the various distractions that plague users (me, specifically) throughout the day, by "getting things done in Chrome." Many of the distractions simply are not there. One would think that the Chrome environment would (or will) be severely limited, but this article goes a long way toward proving otherwise - for what one would assume will be true for the majority of today's users. The browser is the computer. Extensions are the browser. When I stop to think about what I need to do during a typical day in front of a computer, probably 90% can be done right now in Chrome, without even thinking hard about it. Files out of Dropbox, do something with them, files back to Dropbox. Mostly word processing files, PDFs, and spreadsheets. Convert 'em to Google Docs. Simple image editing? Can be done in Chrome. Writing an article like this? Ditto. Access work applications through Citrix? Probably. Give me enough battery life, a good keyboard and screen, some web access through 3G/4G, and I'm in for at least one Chrome OS netbook ...


Thursday, December 9, 2010

What You Can Do When You Go Chrome

Posted by Hooch Tan in "Laptop Thoughts News" @ 11:00 AM

"Chrome OS has always planned to offer "an experience that is nothing but the web," and that makes for some easy setup. In today's demo, Google showed how you can set up a Chrome OS notebook in just four steps. You log in to Google, set up your web connection, take a picture of yourself (or not), and get started."

WebBooks, thin clients, whatever you want to call it, have been tried many times before, but it looks like they may succeed this time. Actually, they have already succeeded. They are called smartphones and to a lesser extent, tablets. Still, it is hard to break from the installed application legacy; just look at how important the app store and Android market are to their respective phones. The Chrome OS seems to straddle the line, though instead of traditional Apps, meaning installed applications that are compiled for that OS, you are looking at web based Apps.

The release of the Chrome notebook also shows how pervasive we expect Internet connections to be. With Wi-Fi for urban areas and 3G/4G for everywhere else, it seems as if we almost would be aghast if we were somewhere without Internet access. I only shudder to think of how much our collective phone bills will cost.

I am in a situation where I still need traditional applications, and do find myself with spotty or impractical Internet access once in a while, so a computer that makes the assumption of always being connected does not make sense to me, but I am sure there are many out there where it does make sense. Is that you? Would you be tempted by a Chrome notebook, or would something like an iPad or netbook be of more interest?


Wednesday, December 8, 2010

Welcome to the Chrome Cr-48 Laptop

Posted by Michael Knutson in "Other Laptops & Netbooks" @ 12:00 AM

http://www.engadget.com/2010/12/07/...rome-os-laptop/

"We've had plenty of pre-knowledge on this, but surprisingly this is our first actual glimpse of Google's new unbranded "Cr-48," the very first Chrome OS laptop. Google will distribute the laptop through its Chrome OS Pilot Program, in a sort of public beta. You actually have to apply to join the program, and there are going to be a limited number of the laptops available -- retail Chrome OS models from Acer and Samsung will be available in the middle of 2011 for the masses."

With a name and looks resembling a no frills cold war-era laptop knockoff from East Germany, the Cr-48 (named after an isotope of chromium) will be available soon in limited quantities to developers and testers. Pretty generic specifications: 12.1-inch screen; full-sized (slightly odd) keyboard; large clickpad; 3G chip; Dual-band WiFi; Webcam; 8 hours or more of use; 8 days or more standby; and flash storage only (bye bye spinning hard drive). I also read that the plan right now is to give 100MB/month of free Verizon (other carriers elsewhere) data transfer for 24 months as part of the package, to ensure that data in the cloud is always available even when disconnected from WiFi. Why 24 months? Is this the average time that a typical user keeps a computer? I like the concept, and the plan to provide persistent connectivity outside of WiFi is a great idea! Anyone have any predictions of what a device like this will cost, if it arrives as anticipated in mid-2011?


Reviews & Articles

Loading feed...

News

Loading feed...

Reviews & Articles

Loading feed...

News

Loading feed...

Reviews & Articles

Loading feed...

News

Loading feed...

Reviews & Articles

Loading feed...

News

Loading feed...

Reviews & Articles

Loading feed...

News

Loading feed...

Sponsored links

404 Not Found

Not Found

The requested URL /pull was not found on this server.


Apache/2.2.16 (Debian) Server at adserver1.eseohserve.com Port 80